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Play Safe, Stay Safe

The University Health Centre has been successful in securing some funding from The Queens Nursing Institute to help raise awareness of Men’s Sexual health. The project aims to deliver sexual health screening via drop in clinics in the Student union Advice Centre and through self-screening packs which will be available around the University of Huddersfield and The University Health Centre.

The Queens Nursing Institute is a registered charity dedicated to improving the nursing care of people in the home and community and will be supporting this year long project. 

For more information click here.


Advance Notice - Car Parking

We would like to inform you that a new Automatic Number Plate Recognition camera controlled car park management system will be in place from April 2017. 

Patients and visitors must enter their full, correct vehicle registration into the terminal at reception to be entitled to up to 1 hour free parking whilst in the Health Centre ONLY. Blue badge holders - all terms and conditions apply. Failure to comply with the terms and conditions will result in a parking charge of £70. We are unable to rescind any parking tickets issued. 

If you are going to be at the Health Centre for more than one hour please inform reception. 


Bank Holiday Closure

The Health Centre will be closed on Friday 14th April 2017 and Monday 17th April 2017. If you require urgent care that cannot wait to reopen please ring the NHS urgent care line on 111. Please be aware that this line can sometimes be very busy but your call will always be answered. The 111 line is free from landlines and mobile phones in the UK. If you feel your problem is an emergency then you may wish to call 999.

The Health Centre will reopen at 8:15am on Tuesday 18th April 2017 as normal. 


Contraception and Sexual Health Clinic (CASH)

From Monday 16th January 2017, the University Health Centre will be offering a drop in Contraception and Sexual Health Clinic (CASH) from 9:30am to 11:30am daily. ‘Pills’, ‘morning after’ pill, condoms, STI screening for both male and female patients. You do not need to book an appointment for this - just turn up! 

Please note pre-bookable CASH clinic appointments will be available daily from 8:30am to 9:30am. 

*This service is for registered patients only*

Routine Childhood Immunisations

When to immunise

Diseases protected against

Vaccine given

Site**

Two months oldDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)DTaP/IPV/Hib (Pediacel)Thigh
Pneumococcal diseasePCV (Prevenar 13)Thigh

Rotavirus

Rotavirus (Rotarix)By mouth
Three months oldDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and HibDTaP/IPV/Hib (Pediacel)Thigh
Meningococcal group C disease (MenC)Men C (NeisVac-C or Menjugate)Thigh
RotavirusRotavirus (Rotarix)By mouth
Four months oldDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and HibDTaP/IPV/Hib (Pediacel)Thigh
Pneumococcal diseasePCV (Prevenar 13)Thigh
Between 12 and 13 months old – within a month of the first birthdayHib/MenCHib/MenC (Menitorix)Upper arm/thigh
Pneumococcal diseasePCV (Prevenar 13)Upper arm/thigh
Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles)MMR (Priorix or MMR VaxPRO)Upper arm/thigh
Three years four months old or soon afterDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliodTaP/IPV (Repevax) or DTaP/IPV(Infanrix-IPV)Upper arm
Measles, mumps and rubellaMMR (Priorix or MMR VaxPRO)(check first dose has been given)Upper arm
Girls aged 12 to 13 years oldCervical cancer caused by human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 (and genital warts caused by types 6 and 11)HPV (Gardasil)Upper arm
Around 14 years oldTetanus, diphtheria and polioTd/IPV (Revaxis), and check MMR statusUpper arm
Meningitis C(Meningitec, Menjugate or NeisVac-C)Upper arm

** Where two or more injections are required at once, these should ideally be given in different limbs. Where this is not possible, injections in the same limb should be given 2.5cm apart.


Protecting Your Baby Against Meningitis And Septicaemia

Information About The MenB Vaccine And Paracetamol Use

From September 2015, a vaccine has been available as part of the NHS childhood immunisation programme, to help protect against MenB disease. Babies will be offered the MenB vaccine the the other routine vaccinations at two months, four months and 12 months of age. Vaccinating babies at these times helps protect them when they are most at risk of developing MenB disease.

Using Paracetamol To Prevent Fever In Babies After The MenB Vaccination

 Fever can be expected after any vaccination, but is more common when the MenB vaccine is given with the other routine vaccines at two and four months. The fever shows the baby's body is responding to the vaccine, although not getting a fever doesn't mean it hasn't worked.

Giving paracetamol will reduce the risk of fever after vaccination. Your nurse will give you more information about paracetamol at your vaccination appointment.

Infant paracetamol should be on your essential shopping list in preparation for your baby's arrival. If you do not have any paracetamol liquid for infants at home you should get some from your local pharmacy or supermarket ready for your two month vaccination visit.

MenB Disease

MenB disease is a serious illness caused by the 'B' strains of meningococcal bacteria. These bacteria are a major cause of meningitis (inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord) and septicaemia (blood poisoning) in young children.

The MenB Vaccine

This vaccine is being offered in addition to the MenC vaccine which is given at three months of age and which has been successful at protecting children against MenC disease but does not protect against other strains of meningococcal bacteria. The MenB vaccine will not protect against other bacteria  and viruses that can cause meningitis and septicaemia. So if you are at all concerned about your baby at any time, then trust your instincts and speak to your GP or call 111. Additional information and advice on the use of paracetamol following your baby's MenB vaccination will be provided at your baby's routine immunisation appointment.

Further information is available at: www.nhs.uk.

 
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