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Extended Access to GP services-Kirklees Survey 

NHS Greater Huddersfield and NHS North Kirklees Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) want to improve the healthcare available to people living in the Kirklees area. They have been given extra funding to improve access to GP services by ensuring that more appointments are available during the early morning, evening and at weekends. This may not be in your local surgery, but would be offered at another location. To help them develop their plans for increasing the number of appointments, they'd like to hear your views. Please take a few minutes to complete a short questionnaire by clicking here

Your feedback will be used by each CCG to help develop services within their own area to meet the needs of the local population. If you would like more information visit www.greaterhuddersfieldccg.nhs.uk or www.northkirkleesccg.nhs.uk


Have You Had Your Meningitis ACWY Vaccine Before Coming To University?

YES - If the answer is YES brilliant, the vaccine will protect you against some of the most common causes of bacterial meningitis in the UK. (You still need to register with us as you never know when you might need us). 

NO - If the answer is NO, you need to get it NOW! Please come to the health centre to register and if you are under the age of 25 ask for your Meningitis ACWY vaccine. 

Make sure you know the signs and symptoms of Meningitis and Septicaemia as vaccines don't protect you against all types! For more information visit: https://www.meningitisnow.org/


Routine Childhood Immunisations

When to immunise

Diseases protected against

Vaccine given

Site**

Two months oldDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)DTaP/IPV/Hib (Pediacel)Thigh
Pneumococcal diseasePCV (Prevenar 13)Thigh

Rotavirus

Rotavirus (Rotarix)By mouth
Three months oldDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and HibDTaP/IPV/Hib (Pediacel)Thigh
Meningococcal group C disease (MenC)Men C (NeisVac-C or Menjugate)Thigh
RotavirusRotavirus (Rotarix)By mouth
Four months oldDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and HibDTaP/IPV/Hib (Pediacel)Thigh
Pneumococcal diseasePCV (Prevenar 13)Thigh
Between 12 and 13 months old – within a month of the first birthdayHib/MenCHib/MenC (Menitorix)Upper arm/thigh
Pneumococcal diseasePCV (Prevenar 13)Upper arm/thigh
Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles)MMR (Priorix or MMR VaxPRO)Upper arm/thigh
Three years four months old or soon afterDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliodTaP/IPV (Repevax) or DTaP/IPV(Infanrix-IPV)Upper arm
Measles, mumps and rubellaMMR (Priorix or MMR VaxPRO)(check first dose has been given)Upper arm
Girls aged 12 to 13 years oldCervical cancer caused by human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 (and genital warts caused by types 6 and 11)HPV (Gardasil)Upper arm
Around 14 years oldTetanus, diphtheria and polioTd/IPV (Revaxis), and check MMR statusUpper arm
Meningitis C(Meningitec, Menjugate or NeisVac-C)Upper arm

** Where two or more injections are required at once, these should ideally be given in different limbs. Where this is not possible, injections in the same limb should be given 2.5cm apart.


Protecting Your Baby Against Meningitis And Septicaemia

Information About The MenB Vaccine And Paracetamol Use

From September 2015, a vaccine has been available as part of the NHS childhood immunisation programme, to help protect against MenB disease. Babies will be offered the MenB vaccine the the other routine vaccinations at two months, four months and 12 months of age. Vaccinating babies at these times helps protect them when they are most at risk of developing MenB disease.

Using Paracetamol To Prevent Fever In Babies After The MenB Vaccination

 Fever can be expected after any vaccination, but is more common when the MenB vaccine is given with the other routine vaccines at two and four months. The fever shows the baby's body is responding to the vaccine, although not getting a fever doesn't mean it hasn't worked.

Giving paracetamol will reduce the risk of fever after vaccination. Your nurse will give you more information about paracetamol at your vaccination appointment.

Infant paracetamol should be on your essential shopping list in preparation for your baby's arrival. If you do not have any paracetamol liquid for infants at home you should get some from your local pharmacy or supermarket ready for your two month vaccination visit.

MenB Disease

MenB disease is a serious illness caused by the 'B' strains of meningococcal bacteria. These bacteria are a major cause of meningitis (inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord) and septicaemia (blood poisoning) in young children.

The MenB Vaccine

This vaccine is being offered in addition to the MenC vaccine which is given at three months of age and which has been successful at protecting children against MenC disease but does not protect against other strains of meningococcal bacteria. The MenB vaccine will not protect against other bacteria  and viruses that can cause meningitis and septicaemia. So if you are at all concerned about your baby at any time, then trust your instincts and speak to your GP or call 111. Additional information and advice on the use of paracetamol following your baby's MenB vaccination will be provided at your baby's routine immunisation appointment.

Further information is available at: www.nhs.uk.

 
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